Turquoise
The Turquoise Collection features books with special appeal for upper elementary readers. Authors Monte Roessell, Joseph Bruchac, Michael Dorris, Caroline Stellings, Gloria Whelan, W.T. Larned, Scott O’Dell, and Jean Craighead George depict, slavery, a boy's journey to adulthood, a Navajo girl’s rite of passage, life and death adventure in the desert southwest, a Lakota chief overcoming his disability and life at Indian boarding school. Itís an exciting collection of stories about the lives of Native American children. This collection is for print disabled (NIMAS qualified) readers.
A Boy Called Slow
This is the story of the coming of age of a boy named Slon-he (SLOW) who grew up to become one of the greatest Lakota hero's - Sitting Bull. As a boy he was given the name Slow because that is how he did everything. Slow was determined to earn a new name and he knew he could only do so by earning the respect of his people by being brave and wise. At the age of 10 he had killed his first buffalo, and at his first war party at age 14, he struck a Crow warrior with his coup stick and spoiled his aim. For these powerful deeds he earned his name Tatan'ka Iyota'ke, Sitting Bull.
Sees Behind Trees
Sees Behind Trees is the name given to a young Indian boy when he passes the test for young men. He is given the name due to his not being able to see as well as the rest of his tribe. Sees Behind uses his heightened sense of hearing to help an elder member of the tribe to find a mysterious land of water, proving to himself that he is truly worthy of his new name and becoming a man.
The Contest
Rosy, a spirited dark-haired girl who is half-Mohawk and the first Native person to enter an Anne of Green Gables look-alike contest. Preparing for the contest is an adventure in itself, and as Rosy overcomes setbacks with her health as well as financial hardships, readers share her discoveries about the true value of friendship, family, and community.
Indian School
It is the autumn of 1839 and Lucy, an orphan, has come to live with her aunt and uncle who run a mission school for Indian children. Aunt Emma is stern and has rules for everything. She gives the students American names and dresses them in drab mission clothes. Uncle Edward tells them that the old ways are gone, and now they must fit into the white man's world. Lucy cannot understand why the Indians are the ones who must do the changing.
North American Indian Tales
This Children's Thrift Classic in Easy-to-read type is adapted from legends collected by noted ethnologist Henry R Schoolcraft in the Lake Superior region in 1839. These enchanting seven stories will delight youngsters and lovers of Native American myth and legend.
Kinaalda, A Navajo Girl Grows Up
Celinda McKelvey, a Navajo girl, participates in the Kinaalda, coming-of-age ceremony of her people at the family's traditional Hogan used mostly for ceremonies. The book also touches on the rebirth of Navajo tradition after long decades during which the U.S. government forcibly removed Navajo children from the reservation and tried to teach them Western culture, language and job skills.
One Day in the Desert
Bird Wing, a young Papago girl, and her mother live in Arizona's Sonoran Desert. A terrible thunderstorm in this usually arid climate causes a flash flood. Bird Wing and all the animals of the desert struggle to find shelter before the flood reaches them. Who will survive? This is a beautiful story about the close bond between human beings and all living things and the unpredictable ways of nature.
Sing Down the Moon
The Navajo tribe's forced march from their homeland to Fort Sumner by white soldiers and settlers is dramatically and courageously told by young Bright Morning. The Spanish Slavers were an ever-present threat to the Navaho way of life. One lovely spring day, fourteen-year-old Bright Morning and her friend Running Bird took their sheep to pasture. The sky was clear blue against the red buttes of the Canyon de Chelly, and the fields and orchards of the Navahos promised a rich harvest. Bright Morning was happy as she gazed across the beautiful valley that was the home of her tribe. She turned when Black Dog barked, and it was then that she saw the Spanish slavers riding straight toward her.
A Boy Called Slow
A Boy Called Slow
This is the story of the coming of age of a boy named Slon-he (SLOW) who grew up to become one of the greatest Lakota hero's - Sitting Bull. As a boy he was given the name Slow because that is how he did everything. Slow was determined to earn a new name and he knew he could only do so by earning the respect of his people by being brave and wise. At the age of 10 he had killed his first buffalo, and at his first war party at age 14, he struck a Crow warrior with his coup stick and spoiled his aim. For these powerful deeds he earned his name Tatan'ka Iyota'ke, Sitting Bull.
Turquoise-1
Includes: 1 copy of each book in the collection; 1 Android tablet; Audio files of each book loaded on the tablet; push button retractable earbuds; bookmarks; convenient carrying tote
$400
 
Purchase and use of this product is restricted. Read more...

This product is restricted to use by persons who are print disabled as determined by a qualified professional under the Chafee Amendment. Please read text below.

The following is a summary of the 1996 Chafee Amendment to the Copyright Law.

Amends Federal copyright law to provide that it is not an infringement of copyright for an authorized entity to reproduce or to distribute copies or phonorecords of a previously published, nondramatic literary work in specialized formats exclusively for use by blind or other persons with disabilities. Requires the copies or phonorecords to: (1) bear a notice that any further reproduction or distribution in a format other than a specialized format is an infringement; and (2) include a copyright notice identifying the copyright owner and the date of the original publication. Exempts standardized, secure, or norm-referenced tests and related testing material and computer programs, except the portions thereof that are in conventional human language (including descriptions of pictorial works) and displayed to users in the ordinary course of using the computer programs.

 

The following is a copy of the 1996 Chafee Amendment to the Copyright Law.

H.R.3754
One Hundred Fourth Congress of the United States of America
AT THE SECOND SESSION AN ACT

Making appropriations for the Legislative Branch for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1997, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Legislative Branch for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1997, and for other purposes, namely:

SEC. 316. Limitation on Exclusive Copyrights for Literary Works in Specialized Format for the Blind and Disabled.--

(a) IN GENERAL--Chapter 1 of title 17, United States Code, is amended by adding after section 120 the following new section:

"SEC.121. Limitations on exclusive rights: reproduction for blind or other people with disabilities

(a) Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 710, it is not an infringement of copyright for an authorized entity to reproduce or to distribute copies or phonorecords of a previously published, nondramatic literary work if such copies or phonorecords are reproduced or distributed in specialized formats exclusively for use by blind or other persons with disabilities.

(b)(1) Copies or phonorecords to which this section applies shall--

(A) not be reproduced or distributed in a format other than a specialized format exclusively for use by blind or other persons with disabilities;

(B) bear a notice that any further reproduction or distribution in a format other than a specialized format is an infringement; and

(C) include a copyright notice identifying the copyright owner and the date of the original publication.

(2) The provisions of this subsection shall not apply to standardized, secure, or norm-referenced tests and related testing material, or to computer programs, except the portions thereof that are in conventional human language (including descriptions of pictorial works) and displayed to users in the ordinary course of using the computer programs.

(c) For purposes of this section, the term--

(1) 'authorized entity' means a nonprofit organization or a governmental agency that has a primary mission to provide specialized services relating to training, education, or adaptive reading or information access needs of blind or other persons with disabilities;

(2) 'blind or other persons with disabilities' means individuals who are eligible or who may qualify in accordance with the Act entitled 'An Act to provide books for the adult blind', approved March 3, 1931 (2 U.S.C. 35a; 46 Stat. 1487) to receive books and other publications produced in specialized formats; and

(3) 'specialized formats' means braille, audio, or digital text which is exclusively for use by blind or other persons with disabilities.".

(b) TECHNICAL AND CONFORMING AMENDMENT--The table of sections for chapter 1 of title 17, United States Code, is amended by adding after the item relating to section 120 the following:

"121. Limitations on exclusive rights: reproduction for blind or other people with disabilities.".

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